39 Famous Types of Lace : Everything You Need to Know

by | Jun 15, 2024

Lace is the only luxury fabric that still has tons of varieties in the modern fashion world. When talking about the lace fabric, we mentioned only a few types of lace. Now, we will cover up most of the names that you should know as a fashion enthusiast. 

You can classify lace fabric by its material, production process, design, origin, etc. But today Muslin Dhaka will only mention the types by material and design. Each category also has some subcategories. We will also talk about them briefly. 

So, take a long breath and drink a glass of water. Because the discussion won’t end soon. 

Let’s start. 

Types of lace by Material

Yarn material plays a significant role in creating unique properties of a fabric. The same goes for lace fabrics or trims. That’s why they are showing you the types of lace by material. 

Cotton Lace

Cotton

Cotton lace is overall the ideal type of lace today. After silk, cotton is the most comfortable type of lacing material. The use of cotton in lacemaking started when Europeans were able to import cotton yarns at a bare minimum price range from Asia. 

Cotton laces are found in various price ranges with different properties. High-quality cotton laces are durable and good to use every day. They are also soft and gentle to your skin. Most of the time, cotton laces cost less than silk ones. That’s why it’s so in demand these days. 

Silk Lace

Silk

Silk lace is a true form of luxury. The sheen and softness of silk yarns add value to the rich designs of lace. The thinness of silk yarns makes the fabric more translucent. An elegant sheen with appealing transparency combined enhances the feminine charm. 

Silk is one of the first materials used in making lace fabrics or trims. Even now, you’d find silk laces in exclusive fashion houses or bridal stores. People use silk lace fabrics only for special occasions. As the fabric is very delicate and prone to damage, people avoid using it regularly. 

Linen

Linen was also the material used to make laces at the beginning. Nowadays, the use of line lace is rarely seen. The price of linen isn’t too high. So, linen fabric is quite affordable for general people. 

The texture of linen fibers is soft and smooth. It feels good on even sensitive areas. You can use linen lace for everyday use. 

Wool

It’s not a common material. Still, there is quite some demand for these types of fabrics. Woolen lace is used to make designed and colorful accessories. There are also dresses containing woolen lace trim or layers. 

Polyester Applique Lace

Polyester

Polyester laces have been in demand recently. Because polyester lace can cost half of the cotton lace. Also, polyester can endure rough uses quite easily. So, the use of polyester lace in your regular outfit will enhance the fashion without increasing the price too much. 

Nylon lace

Nylon

Nylon laces are very durable. Nylon can be used in many different ways. Nylon laces make durable undergarments for women. There are also beautiful table runners made of nylon laces. The most appreciable fact of nylon is it requires a very small amount of maintenance. 

Metallic Lace

Metallic

Back in the early period, the trend of using expansive metal threads like gold or silver to make dresses for aristocrats was common all over the world. We also find evidence of rich metallic laces in history books. 

But in this age, no expensive metal is used to make metallic yarns. Eligible affordable metals are infused with synthetic or natural fibers to create metallic yarns. When used in lacing, metallic yarns provide a strong sheen and structure to the fabric. Some even have mirror effects under light. 

Main Types of Lace by Design or Construction

Buying a good type of lace obviously reflects your fashion sense & taste. But how do you ensure that? Obviously, you have to have a decent knowledge of lace fabrics. Specifically speaking, the types of lace fabrics and designs. So that you can buy the right one. 

Below are the 39 main types of lace fabrics. Know them thoroughly to understand what’s best for you. 

bobbin lace

Bobbin Lace 

  • Origin: 

Flemish regions, in the 16th century

  • Uses:

All general uses 

  • Brief: 

Bobbin lacing is one of two primary lacing methods. Some say that the revolution of lace fabric started when bobbin or pillow lace became famous throughout Europe. 

Our research says, Bobbin lace has the most number of subcategories and design varieties. By customizing or adding a few steps to the primary method, a new type of bobbin lace can be created. 

Bobbin lace is a versatile option to use. Using traditional bobbin lace fabrics would reflect your rich taste in fashion. 

  • SubTypes: 
  1. Chantilly Lace
  2. Valenciennes Lace
  3. Guipure Lace
  4. Antwerp Lace
  5. Val Lace Lace
  6. Brussels lace
  7. Blonde Lace
  8. Bruges Duchess Lace
  9. Madeira Lace
  10. Mechlin Lace
  11. Torchon Lace

Needle Lace

Needle Lace 

  • Origin: 

Italy, 16th century

  • Uses:

Exclusive fashions, expensive accessories, etc.

  • Brief: 

Needle lace is another primary lacing technique after bobbin lace. The main beauty of needle lace appears when it’s done manually like it should be. But nowadays, some parts of needle lacing have become automated. It’s to reduce labor costs and production time. 

However, you can still find authentic needle lace products in some parts of Europe like England, France, Italy, and Belgium. Needle lacing has evolved in different places. Some countries also have their own ways of making needlepoint lace.

  • SubTypes: 
  1. Alençon Lace
  2. Aemilia Ars Lace
  3. Argentan Lace
  4. Brussel Needlepoint Lace
  5. Hollie Point Lace
  6. Inishmacsaint Lace
  7. Kenmare Lace
  8. Point de Sedan Lace
  9. Point Colbert Lace
  10. Puncetto Lace
  11. Punto in Aria Lace
  12. Point d’Irlande Lace
  13. Carrickmacross Lace

crochet lace

Crocheted Lace

  • Origin: 

Either Italy (16th century) or France (19the century)

  • Uses:

Dress trims, accessories, etc. 

  • Brief: 

Crochet is a type of French hook. In the beginning, hooks made of bone or metal were used to create a unique stitching. Continuous stitching created crocheted lace or sheet. 

Crochet lace can be made of cotton or other natural fibers. But these days people consider it as a type of cotton lace fabric. This lacing method creates small accessories like dress trims, collars, calves, sleeves, hats, etc. 

  • SubTypes: 
  1. Irish Crocheted Lace

chemical lace

Schiffli/Chemical Lace

  • Origin: 

Switzerland, 19th century

  • Uses:

Trimming, layering, and redesigning fabrics

  • Brief: 

Chemical lace isn’t a handmade production. First, a sheer or netlike base is taken. Then, a motif is created by threads using Schiffli machines. Afterward, the finished product is put in a chemical so that the areas left without designs dissolve. The only thing left after that is the sole motif. 

Chemical lace is a very open construction with only designs and no ground. The motifs can be used as appliques on plain tops or blouses. But many artisans don’t consider schiffli lace as an ideal type of lace. 

  • SubTypes: 

None

Alencon lace

Alençon Lace

(Collected from Wikimedia)

  • Origin: 

France, 17th century

  • Uses:

Wedding gowns

  • Brief: 

Alençon Lace is a type of needle lace that is specially made for exclusive designer dresses. Nowadays, it is a key fabric to make bridal gowns. Alencon lace mostly contains rich natural fibers. The fibers to design are normally thick to make a raised texture. 

This lace has a very rich history. Napoleon himself wore a dress containing handmade Alencon during his coronation ceremony. Still now, Alençon lace is handmade. It remains one of the top luxury fabrics from Europe

  • SubTypes: 

None

Knitted Lace

  • Origin: 

Unknown

  • Uses:

Bridal wear, Appealing dress, lingerie, accessories, etc. 

  • Brief: 

Knit lace fabric is almost as stretchy as other knitted fabrics. It is good for making snug-fit items. Women who wish to show their curves appealingly can try thing fabric. 

Knitted lace is also a fancy material for making lingerie items. Bright colors with floral designs in knitted lace make intimate moments fascinating. 

  • SubTypes: 

Warp knitted Lace

Sheer Lace

  • Origin: 

Unknown

  • Uses:

Overlay, trimming, lingerie, etc. 

  • Brief: 

Lace fabric itself is a type of sheer textile. Sheer lace is a type of lace that has more open pockets than other laces. 

Sheer lace fabrics have larger holes. The construction barely covers any of your skin. It can’t be used solo. You can use it to layer a plain cloth. Or, you can try this fabric to make some nightgowns you can wear over your tops. 

  • SubTypes: 

none

torchon lace

Torchon Lace

  • Origin: 

Unknown

  • Uses:

General uses

  • Brief: 

Torchon lace is one of the durable bobbin lace types. It requires thicker yarns. In the beginning, torchon lace had only linen construction. But now, cotton is vastly used to make this fabric. 

Torchon lace isn’t a luxury type of lace. Instead, it was made for those who weren’t nobles. That’s why another name for this lace is beggar’s lace. Some even say beggar’s lace is a modified version of torchon lace. Nowadays, this lacing makes regular wear and household accessories. 

  • SubTypes: 

Beggar’s Lace

Cutwork or Whitework Lace

  • Origin: 

Italy, Renaissance period

  • Uses:

Lightweight clothing and home decor

  • Brief: 

Cutwork lace is now a machine-made variant of European lacing. Structured holes or gaps are created in an existing sheer fabric to cutwork. Then, some works are done on the holes to make them a permanent design. 

Cutwork laces are available everywhere. They don’t cost much. The lace is available in cotton and linen normally. But you’ll also find synthetic ones that might not be as elegant as the cotton types. 

  • SubTypes: 
  1. Broderie Anglaise Lace
  2. Carrickmacross lace
  3. Reticella lace

Macrame Lace

  • Origin: 

Arab, around 13th century

  • Uses:

Home decor and accessories

  • Brief: 

Macrame lace is a type of knotted lace. The word macrame came from an Arabian word. Macrame lace isn’t primarily a type of lacing. A few artisans don’t even put it in this category. 

However, this technique helps to make fancy home decor items like wall matt, tablecloths, etc. You can find macrame bags all over the world. 

  • SubTypes: 

Greek Finger lace

knotted lace

Knotted Lace

  • Origin: 

Armenia

  • Uses:

Trimming, fashion items, home decor, accessories, etc. 

  • Brief: 

Various knots in a series create a knotted fabric or trim. Like said earlier macrame or knotted lace is not a traditional lacing type. The final product of the method gives a lace-like look. That’s the reason why it’s called a new form of lace. 

Knotted lace is an evergreen item to make fancy home decor items such as hangers, carpets, bed throws, etc. Women’s accessories like shawls, veils, etc. are also made of knotted lace in some areas. 

  • SubTypes: 
  1. Filet Lace
  2. Shuttle Lace
  3. Modano Lace
  4. Tatting Lace
  5. Macrame Lace

Corded Lace

Corded Lace

(Image from Etsy seller)

  • Origin: 

France

  • Uses:

Luxury fashion, appealing wear, etc 

  • Brief: 

The corded lace technique features motifs with a three-dimensional look. The designs are raised to be more realistic. It is another French creation for women’s apparel. 

Corded lace uses rich fibers of cotton or silk. The fibers can be thick to make motifs look highly separated from the ground. The fabric isn’t too thin. So, it makes good bridal wear and event dresses. 

  • SubTypes: 

Embossed lace

Applique lace

Applique Lace

  • Origin: 

18th century

  • Uses:

Motiffing over any plain fabric

  • Brief: 

Applique is a whole motif that you can put on a plain fabric. As it can work like lace fabrics, we put it in this category. 

Applique lace can be made of various materials including cotton, polyester, silk, etc. Based on the intricacy and material quality, the price is determined. Using applique lace is a very easy way to groom your plain clothes. 

  • SubTypes: 

None

Chantilly lace

Chantilly Lace 

(Image of Etsy product)

  • Origin: 

France

  • Uses:

Women’s fashion wear

  • Brief: 

This is another fabric for making bridal gowns. Designers use Chantilly lace to make formal and party wear too. The lace is very comfortable to wear and sew. Handmade chantilly laces are one of the demanding luxury items in wedding wear. 

Chantilly lace is very detailed. Any pattern or design remains noticeable in the construction. Despite so, the whole structure is lightweight and breathable. Dense designs don’t make the fabric a burden for the wearer. 

  • SubTypes:

None

Tape Lace

  • Origin: 

Italy, after 16th century

  • Uses:

Clothing designing, lingerie, etc. 

  • Brief: 

Tape lace means exactly what the name says. Designs or shapes over the fabric tape for redecoration. 

Tape lace method has a history of making simple, yet elegant clothes for women. There are a few famous types of tape laces in the market. The traditional tape lacing has become automated and modified a lot. 

  • SubTypes: 
  1. Battenburg Lace
  2. Dichtl Lace
  3. Tape Lace

Stretch Lace

  • Origin: 

Unknown

  • Uses:

General uses

  • Brief: 

Stretch lace isn’t a specific lacing method. Instead, laces that contain elastane materials are called stretch laces. They are a new kind of lace for everyday use. 

Usually, lace seems a delicate fabric. So, using them on a regular basis might be a risky thing to do. A small stretch and the beautiful lace might tear apart. So, commercial industries have infused spandex or elastane with cotton fibers to make stretch lace that you can use without worrying. 

  • SubTypes: 

Any lace type can be a stretch lace

Limerick Lace

Limerick Lace

  • Origin: 

Ireland or England, 19th century

  • Uses:

Overlay, fabric redecoration, etc. 

  • Brief: 

Limerick lace isn’t a popular choice nowadays. The popularity of this fabric was far gone before the 21st century appeared. 

But during the early stages, this lacing was at its peak in the areas of Great Britain. The specialty of this lace is multiple filling stitches. Applying almost 50 filling stitches was also possible in the method. 

  • SubTypes: 

None

Beaded Lace

Beaded Lace

  • Origin: 

Unknown

  • Uses:

Fashion, Trimming, etc.

  • Brief: 

Beaded fabrics are for gorgeous fashion. The same goes for beaded lace fabrics too. Beading small pearls or glitters on lace motifs is a very creative way to enhance dresses. 

The construction of beaded laces is very complex. That’s why this type of lace doesn’t come cheap. You can use beaded lace trims or overlays to redecorate your party wear. 

  • SubTypes: 

Sequin Lace

Fully Patterned Lace

  • Origin: 

Unknown

  • Uses:

General Purposes

  • Brief: 

Allover of fully patterned lace fabric is a generic type of lace. It doesn’t cost much. Yet, famous fashion artisans still prefer using this fabric for quality dressmaking. 

In this fabric, patterns are all over the sheet. From a distance, it feels like the textile is printed with floral or geometric designs. Because of this not-so-unique quality, the allover lace hasn’t earned much of a reputation. 

  • SubTypes: 

None

Chevron Lace

  • Origin: 

Unknown

  • Uses:

Shawls, mufflers, scarves, sleeves, etc.

  • Brief: 

Chevron lace is a zigzag patterned lacing. It is a common and easy method. The process is alive in several countries. Primarily, handmade chevron laces are more available than machine-made ones. 

Chevron lace looks simple. Women who prefer not to stand out in a gathering like this type. The lacing technique is pretty durable. You can make winter accessories like scarves and shawls using this fabric. 

  • SubTypes: 

None

Embossed Lace

  • Origin: 

Around 16th century

  • Uses:

Dressmaking, accessories, home decor, etc. 

  • Brief: 

Embossing is a technique. Here, you raise the pattern or design from the ground fabric to add a dimension. It’s almost like corded or Alencon lace. You can emboss a fabric using different methods. 

Embossed can be both a luxury and regular item. It depends on how it’s made. Embossing using heat or chemicals is a simple job. So, the price of this textile is pretty affordable. But manually embossed lace doesn’t cost like the ordinary one. 

  • SubTypes: 

None

Eyelash lace

French Eyelash Lace

(Dress from MadameTulle)

  • Origin: 

France

  • Uses:

Lingerie, exclusive designer dress, accessories, etc. 

  • Brief: 

French eyelash lace comes with thin and smooth open yarns at the edge of the border. The open threads are like the long eyelashes of women. That’s why it’s named like this. 

The main structure of eyelash lace is often very sheer. Making it an ideal material to make bold fashions and lingerie. The fabric is very soft and gentle. Girls who have sensitive skin can try this out. 

  • SubTypes: 

None

3D Lace

  • Origin: 

Europe

  • Uses:

Bold fashion, Luxury dress, overlay, etc.

  • Brief: 

3d lace has a complete sheer ground. It is to make the motifs visible like 3D objects. The ground keeps your skin completely visible. The designs look like they are appliqued on your body. This is what makes the fabric so special. 

Applique can sometimes fail to bring perfection. Thus, 3D laces are the better alternatives to applique lace. It is best to use the fabric as an overlay if you don’t want to be too exposing. 

  • SubTypes: 

Embossed Lace

Bruges Duchess Lace

  • Origin: 

Belgium, 19th century

  • Uses:

General purposes

  • Brief: 

It is another historic type of bobbin lace. Dutchess lace is a cost-effective version of authentic Brussels lace. It comes cheap. It also doesn’t have any significant nature. 

However, the fabric was still a good choice for those who couldn’t afford luxury fabrics. The designs were very minimal in this type. 

  • SubTypes: 

Princess Lace

Lyon Lace

Lyon Lace

(Image of Atelier Dentelles

  • Origin: 

France, 19th century

  • Uses:

Rare luxury items

  • Brief: 

Lyon lace is something you can’t buy anytime. The production of this fabric is very limited. Tools and artisans required to make this fabric are only found in Lyon, France. 

It is an authentic French lace. The coloring of this textile is done manually most of the time. It’s a very intricate lacing. It takes weeks to manually form a design or pattern over the fabric. People wait for months to get their hands on this luxury item. 

  • SubTypes: 

None

Entredeux lace

Swiss Entredeux Lace

(Image: Lace Beauty/Etsy)

  • Origin: 

Either Switzerland or France

  • Uses:

Integrating two layers

  • Brief: 

Swiss Entredeux lace is used to join two different sheets together in dressmaking. The Entredeux lace can have floral designs or simple geometric patterns. 

The construction of this fabric varies from place to place. The yarns used in the fabric are pretty strong. It can withstand tensions among stitches. 

  • SubTypes: 

None

Lace Mesh 

  • Origin: 

16th century

  • Uses:

Lingerie, skirts, layering, etc.

  • Brief: 

Mesh lace is almost like a net or mesh fabric. It has decorated and patterned gaps throughout the fabric. There’s nothing too unique about this fabric. Companies tried to modify and bring different types of lace mesh. Most of them didn’t have anything to be called exclusive. 

  • SubTypes: 
  1. Tulle Lace
  2. Filet Lace
  3. Tortoiseshell Lace

Warp Knitted Lace

  • Origin: 

18th century

  • Uses:

Versatile uses

  • Brief: 

Warp knitting is a method of making thin or sheer fabrics. Warp knitted laces are lightweight. It is also a good choice for making exotic lingerie and gowns. 

Besides, warp-knitted trips can enhance simple clothing. As they weigh less, the core clothing feels like before after infusing laces. The latest warp-knitted lace is Raschel lace. It is a cheap substitute for luxury leaver lace. 

  • SubTypes: 

Raschel Lace

Eyelet lace

(Image: Craftise/Etsy)

Eyelet Lace

  • Origin: 

Czech Republic, 19th century

  • Uses:

Trimming, Undergarments, home decor, etc. 

  • Brief: 

Some say eyelets are an alternative to original lace fabrics. However, the construction makes it very similar to primary lace fabrics. That’s why we’re mentioning it here. 

This is a very famous textile for summer wear. Many fashion designers from the West prefer using eyelet lace to make comfy wear. Apart from that, eyelet curtains are also on trend these days. 

  • SubTypes: 

None

Point D’Esprit Lace

Point D’Esprit Lace

  • Origin: 

18th century

  • Uses:

Fashion items, dresses, home decor, etc. 

  • Brief: 

This fabric is very similar to soft tulle fabric. There are lots of similarities between them. However, Point D’Esprit is more versatile than tulle. The texture and feel are premium. 

The outlook is pretty simple. Dots or circles all over textiles. The ground is sheer to semi-sheer. In total, it’s perfect for overlaying any type of fabric. 

  • SubTypes: 

None

embroidered lace

Embroidered Lace 

  • Origin: 

Lacing and Embroidery combined to create a new type of fabric in Europe

  • Uses:

Bridal wear and other general use

  • Brief: 

Performing embroidery over a netting sheer layer creates embroidered lace fabric. Embroidery is totally a different concept from lacing. So, some even concierge embroidered lace as a sole product of embroidery. 

But we’ve seen many luxury fashion hubs using embroidered lace fabrics to make wedding gowns. And they consider this as a luxury lace fabric. That’s why we’re also not opposing it being a lace type. 

  • SubTypes: 
  1. Leaver Lace
  2. Coggeshall Embroidery Lace
  3. Lefkara Lace
  4. Lier Lace
  5. Sicilian Lace

Double Toned Lace

  • Origin: 

Unknown

  • Uses:

General uses

  • Brief: 

Two-toned or double-color lace comes with two shades of a single color. Sometimes, there can be different colors too. 

It is not a lacing type but a dyeing method to make the simplest laces unique. Multiple tones in sheer lace fabrics can create a catchy silhouette behind the fabric. So, younger girls might find this type good enough. 

  • SubTypes: 

None

Crosshatch Lace

  • Origin: 

Unknown

  • Uses:

Bridal wear

  • Brief: 

Crosshatch is a technique in making mostly woven fabrics. However, crosshatch lace has become a different niche nowadays. 

Although you can use it with any type of clothing. We’ve seen experts only use it to make bridal wear.

  • SubTypes: 

None

Guipure Lace

Guipure/Venetian Lace

(Source: Wikimedia)

  • Origin: 

Italy, 16th century

  • Uses:

Exclusive fashion, Bridal gowns, etc. 

  • Brief: 

After chantilly, guipure is the most demanding type of lace fabric. Unlike other delicate lace fabrics, it lasts longer due to its denser yarns. It feels like any other luxury clothing fabric, for example muslin

Guipure lace fabric can be a bit stiff. But it won’t hurt your skin at all. The little structured nature is good for exclusive winter wear. Due to its raised patterns, the designs are more visible in guipure lace. 

  • SubTypes: 
  1. Bedfordshire Maltese lace
  2. Cluny Lace
  3. Genoese Lace
  4. Princess Lace

Venise à Rose

  • Origin: 

Belgium, around 18th century

  • Uses:

Fashion Clothing

  • Brief: 

Belgian Venise a Rose is a well-constructed lace type. Even from a distance, the motifs are clearly visible. This is the key feature of this fabric. 

Venice a Rose and other Venice lace are very close to Exclusive guipure lace. But the feel and look of Rose Venice isn’t that luxurious. So, it’s best to use the fabrics for trimming and layering.

  • SubTypes: 

None

princess lace

Princess Lace

(Source: Soul of Eve Vintage/Etsy)

  • Origin: 

Belgium, 19th century

  • Uses:

Undergarments, Trimming, Light Home decor, etc. 

  • Brief: 

Nowadays, princess lace is not a common name. It’s on the verge of extinction. The patterns in the lace might be crisp. Yet, it’s not too appealing or feminine. 

However, the softness makes this lace a good material to make comfortable undergarments. 

  • SubTypes: 

None

Kells Lace

  • Origin: 

Ireland, 19th century

  • Uses:

Undergarments, Trimming, etc. 

  • Brief: 

Kells lace is now found only in museums. It was so popular that the Queen Adelaide herself made a purchase. At that time, the trade was more than 2 thousand Euros (according to current market value). 

queen adelaide

  • SubTypes: 

Moynalty Lace

Valenciennes Lace

Valenciennes Lace

(from Wikimedia)

  • Origin: 

France, 17th century

  • Uses:

Expensive home decor, crafts, undergarments, etc. 

  • Brief: 

Unlike guipure lace, Valenciennes lace has a cleat net-like ground. The motifs aren’t way above the base too. Vale lace lost its charm when artisans discontinued making it manually. 

Nowadays, it’s made with machines. But the prices aren’t like regular clothes. You can think of it as an affordable luxury. 

  • SubTypes: 

None

leaver lace

Captured from Business Insiders Documentary. Watch the full video here.

French Leavers Lace

  • Origin: 

France

  • Uses:

Exclusive luxury items

  • Brief: 

We’re ending our lists with the most expensive lace in the world. French Leavers lace costs you a few times more than even the luxury silk fabrics you know of. The making of this fabric is unique. It requires both manual and automated labor. 

Leavers lace is not your everyday item. It works as a symbol of wealth. You might not understand the difference with bare eyes. But the touch and feel will give you an experience compared to none. 

Business tycoons and celebrities across the world keep a close eye on new arrivals made of French Leavers lace. A few yards of leavers lace is equal to a whole silk chiffon dress in terms of cost. 

  • SubTypes: 

None

Luxury Lace Buying Guide

How to Buy the Right Type of Lace For You

As there are so many types of lace in the market, it might not be easy for you to pick one. So, let’s help you out. 

Material

Without a doubt, natural fibers are the best materials for high-quality lace. We prefer only silk and cotton. Nylon and polyester laces can be durable. But the look and feel are way off. As you are investing some money, you should focus only for the natural fibers. 

Plain Lace Finish

Quality & Finish

The patterns are quality laces are regular and organized. Motifs should be evenly aligned without any flaws. Besides, the height or rise of motifs needs to be according to the type. 

Asian Lace Trims

Color

Black, white, and other plain colors are ideal for classic lace fabrics. But mixed color or infusion of various dyes won’t be an issue if you love fancy outfits. 

Softness

Nothing will matter if you’re not comfortable wearing the lace fabric. Clothing lace fabrics should be the softest. But if you are buying a few yards for home decor, any exception goes fine. 

Weight

The average weight range of lace fabrics is around 40-180 GSM. But you need to buy 50 GSM or less if you intend to overlay or trim your dress. Sometimes, people buy heavier ones for more structured dressmaking. Heavy laces are also good for the winter season. 

Design

Don’t forget about the design. Pick a design that suits you or your fashion most. Dense designs can make the product slightly stiff. But if the yarn quality is good, this won’t be an issue. 

Exclusive Cotton Lace

Best Picks

If the buying guide isn’t helping you much, then follow this list.

  • Most expensive: French Leavers
  • Rarest  type: Lyon
  • Most popular: Chantilly
  • Best luxury alternative: Raschel
  • Classic Luxury: Alencon
  • Best for winter luxury: Guipure
  • For both luxury and durability: Guipure
  • Thinnest luxury: Chantilly

FAQ

What is handmade lace called? 

There’s no exact name for handmade lace. Traditionally, there are two primary types of lacing: bobbin and needlepoint. You can do both manually. The name is primarily decided by the method you’re using. Either handmade bobbin or handmade needlepoint. 

What is the best lace type? 

The best type of lace is the one made of cotton or silk. Swiss variants of laces are more popular these days. But French ones are always special regarding luxury and quality. 

Why is lace so expensive?

Lace is expensive because it requires lots of time and effort. Lacing is not just a fabric production process. It’s an art that very few artisans can do. You need to put your creativity and skills on the line while making a new lace fabric. 

Is French lace better? 

Yes, French laces are better options. In terms of luxury, quality, design, and materials, French luxury hubs always keep their standards high. But not all French laces are good. 

What is the most delicate lace? 

Chantilly lace is the most delicate type of lace you’ll find in the market. It’s very light and soft. Designers use this material to make special event wear. But you can also use it for trimming.

Summary : types of lace

So, this is the end, right? You must be feeling relieved that this huge article has come to an end. Well, we’re also happy too. Because we keep you hooked & share our wisdom till the end. 

However, if you think we missed a name or two in this list, then tell us right away. We’ll be happy to make our list more enriched. 

In fine, we share all types of lace. And if you want to know more about fashion and fabrics, read our article on types of cotton fabrics. You get to know a lot about cotton fabrics that you can have in your closet. 

Shariful Alam

Shariful Alam

Shariful Alam Pavel, A fashion lover, passionate marketer. Love to share wisdom based on real life experience to enrich knowledge.
Founder of Muslin Dhaka, a brand, speaks the truth about royal muslin and fashion. Explore the digital fashion universe with organic cotton muslin and much more!

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